Arnold OKs ban on chemical in toys


first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGame Center: Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, 10 a.m.AB 1471 by Assemblyman Mike Feuer, D-Los Angeles, will require semiautomatic handguns made and sold in California to include crime-fighting technology that will microstamp each bullet fired from the gun. It’s also the first such measure in the nation. The NRA and other foes argued that the technique is not reliable and could be used to implicate innocent people. Schwarzenegger said, in his signing message, that he understands the technology is not perfect, but hopes it will provide law enforcement with a new tool to solve violent crimes. The law won’t take effect until 2010. The governor also signed AB 821 by Assemblyman Pedro Nava, D-San Barbara, banning lead ammunition in certain areas of the state where lead bullets are believed to be the source of poisoning of endangered condors. Copper ammunition will instead be allowed. Audubon California representatives praised the governor’s decision, calling the legislation a creative solution that allows wildlife protection and hunting to coexist. SACRAMENTO – Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger signed legislation Sunday making California the first state in the nation to ban use of a toxic chemical in baby toys, forging a theme of defying conservative interests as he pushed toward a midnight deadline to deal with more than 950 bills sent to his desk by state lawmakers. Despite industry opposition, the Republican governor signed AB 1108 by Assemblywoman Fiona Ma, D-San Francisco, prohibiting the use of phthalates to make plastic flexible. “When a child puts a phthalate-laden teether in her mouth,” said Rachel Gibson of Environment California, “it’s like sucking on a toxic lollipop.” Perhaps the biggest news over the weekend came when the governor signed two ammunition-related bills vigorously opposed by the National Rifle Association. But Lawrence Keane, of the National Shooting Sports Foundation, said that Schwarzenegger “has proven to gun owners and sportsmen that he is just another liberal anti-gun Hollywood actor.” And even though the governor, as expected, vetoed the most significant gay rights legislation – a marriage bill by Assemblyman Mark Leno, D-San Francisco – he signed eight other measures backed by gay rights advocates. They include implementing joint tax filing by domestic partners and reinforcing anti-discrimination laws for gay youth in schools. Ultimately, this year’s session paled in comparison with the session last year, when he teamed with Democrats to produce unprecedented legislation to curb global emissions and get $43 billion in infrastructure bonds approved by voters. A budget standoff eroded legislative efforts and a bipartisan atmosphere. Left out were such issues as health care reform, sentencing and parole reform as well as assisted suicide, water storage and redistricting reform. [email protected] (916) 447-9302160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img

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