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first_img– Advertisement – It’s been a difficult year for lots of retailers, who will be hoping Black Friday – and its bigger cousin Cyber Monday – will give them a much-needed boost.- Advertisement –last_img


first_img Metro Sport ReporterWednesday 23 Oct 2019 6:37 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link Comment Advertisement Leeds kept within two points of Championship pacesetters West Brom thanks to Eddie Nketiah’s goal against West Brom (Picture: Getty)‘When you manage this, this fact had some difficulties the supporters cannot see. It’s natural people argue with my decision because they don’t have all the reasons I have.‘Bamford is a great player and Eddie Nketiah is a great player as well. I am forced to make both of them a success this year because if not I am not going to take advantage.‘If one has success I will not be able to take advantage of the other one. This process lasts nine months and we have 46 matches or 50 matches.More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal‘We are in 25 per cent of the competition. We have time in the future so I can find a way both of them will shine.‘If this doesn’t happen it’s not going to be a mistake of mine. In the last press conference I said if Nketiah is not a success here it’s my fault. It’s the same with Patrick.‘I am trying to make this work.’MORE: What is Unai Emery’s best Arsenal XI and why isn’t he playing it?MORE: Patrice Evra tells Nicolas Pepe to ‘build massive body’ in the gym after slow Arsenal start Eddie Nketiah scored a crucial equaliser for Leeds against Preston last night (Picture: Getty)Marcelo Bielsa defended his use of Eddie Nketiah after the on-loan Arsenal striker rescued Leeds with a late equaliser against Preston last night.The England Under-21 international admitted last week he was frustrated by the bit-part role he has been restricted to since his temporary move to Elland Road.Nketiah is yet to start a Championship game despite scoring five goals in total, including last night’s towering header, which kept Bielsa’s team two points adrift of Championship pacesetters West Bromwich Albion.‘Start him!!!’ tweeted Nketiah’s mentor and Arsenal legend Wright after the 20-year-old’s rescue act at Deepdale but Bielsa insists the England Under-21 international will have to bide his time given the options he has at his disposal.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENT‘When you have more than one option for the team, it’s never a problem. It’s two solutions for one problem. I try to manage this,’ said the Leeds manager. Marcelo Bielsa hits back at Eddie Nketiah criticism after Ian Wright demand Advertisementlast_img read more


first_imgA number of homes have been left without power this morning after a power outage in Gortlee, Letterkenny.Up to 170 properties have been affected by the outage which was caused by an electrical fault.ESB workers are working to restore electrical supplies which are expected to be repaired by 2:30pm this evening (Monday) ESB said: “We apologise for the loss of supply. We are currently working to repair a fault affecting the premises and will restore power as quickly as possible.”Over 100 homes without power in Gortlee was last modified: August 26th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more


first_imgPhew, finally: now we know how cacti evolved, reports EurekAlert.  Ouch!  On second thought, how’s that again?    Two Yale scientists set out to figure out how the succulent plants turned leaves into spines.  Using molecular methods, they identified the earliest cactus, but then said it “already showed water use patterns that are similar to the leafless, stem-succulent cacti.” “[Our] analyses suggest that several key elements of cactus ecological function were established prior to the evolution of the cactus life form,” explain the authors.  “Such a sequence may be common in evolution, but it has rarely been documented as few studies have incorporated physiological, ecological, anatomical, and phylogenetic data.”But if the key innovations for cactus ecological function were already present, how is this an example of evolution?The press release is shamefully titled, “How did cactuses evolve?”  It should be titled, “Did cacti evolve?”  Apparently not; they were already adapted for their water use lifestyle from the start.  If “this sequence is common in evolution,” where the function already exists before the evolution begins, it sounds like creation, not evolution.    Enough with the Darwinian tales.  Focus instead on the design features of these amazing plants.  The article rightly states, “The cactus form is often heralded as a striking example of the tight relationship between form and function in plants.  A succulent, long-lived photosynthetic system allows cacti to survive periods of extreme drought while maintaining well-hydrated tissues.”  That is design, folks, not evolution.(Visited 59 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more


first_imgInstead of showing remorse over a Lazarus taxon, evolutionists invoke another besetting sin: vestigial organs.The poster child for living fossils is Coelacanth, a lobe-finned fish long thought extinct till a living one was found swimming just fine in 1938 off the coast of South Africa. That discovery drowned notions of it evolving into a land animal, because its bony fins were not used for locomotion on the bottom in shallow waters. Instead, the fish spends much of its time in a vertical posture.One might suppose that evolutionists would be embarrassed by this double falsification. One might hope they would turn their attention to either finding more fossils of coelacanths in the intervening layers of the fossil record, or admitting that evolution did almost nothing to these fish for allegedly 66 million years since they went extinct. Even worse, evolutionists must admit there was no major change to the coelacanth kind for 344 million years, according to their standard evolutionary timeline.Instead, a paper in Nature Communications (open access) now alleges that living coelacanths have a vestigial organ: a lung.  This term “vestigial” has long been an embarrassment to evolutionists, because most (or all) of the hundred-some-odd vestigial organs alleged in the human body a century ago have since been found to be functional. Nevertheless, the team of international researchers uses the term freely:Coelacanths are lobe-finned fishes known from the Devonian to Recent that were long considered extinct, until the discovery of two living species in deep marine waters of the Mozambique Channel and Sulawesi. Despite extensive studies, the pulmonary system of extant coelacanths has not been fully investigated. Here we confirm the presence of a lung and discuss its allometric growth in Latimeria chalumnae, based on a unique ontogenetic series. Our results demonstrate the presence of a potentially functional, well-developed lung in the earliest known coelacanth embryo, and its arrested growth at later ontogenetic stages, when the lung is clearly vestigial. The parallel development of a fatty organ for buoyancy control suggests a unique adaptation to deep-water environments. Furthermore, we provide the first evidence for the presence of small, hard, flexible plates around the lung in L. chalumnae, and consider them homologous to the plates of the ‘calcified lung’ of fossil coelacanths.Live Science repeated the idea uncritically, without mentioning the embarrassments about this fish not evolving for hundreds of millions of years, then disappearing and reappearing after tens of millions of years.It’s possible that the lung became less developed as the coelacanth moved to deeper waters, but remnants of it still exist as a vestigial organ, the researchers said. However, as the lung shrank and became useless, a fatty organ that the fish uses for buoyancy control in deep waters grew and took over the space once occupied by the lung.But what this implies is that a more-complex organ, a lung, appeared fully formed in the fossil coelacanths, then atrophied:This lung likely helped the fish survive in low-oxygen, shallow waters hundreds of millions of years ago, the researchers said. During the Mesozoic era, more commonly known as the dinosaur age, it’s likely that some species of coelacanth (see-leh-kanth) moved to deeper waters, stopped using their lungs and began relying exclusively on their gills to breathe, the researchers said.PhysOrg‘s coverage didn’t mention “vestigial organs” directly, but says, “Similar to the human appendix, the organ was likely rendered defunct by evolution.” This is a common myth. A function for the appendix was found eight years ago (10/06/07, 8/21/09). It’s obvious, anyway, that evolution’s major challenge is to create function, not render it defunct.The article did call the coelacanth a “Lazarus” taxon, “a group of animals ‘resurrected’ from extinction.” The antecedent Lazarus (a man who was in a tomb four days), it must be remembered, was raised to life by intelligent design—the divine power of Jesus Christ, according to the Gospel of John, chapter 11.Let’s count the ways that evolutionists have bungled and mangled the story of coelacanth. (1) This large, well-adapted fish appears fully formed 410 million years ago in their timeline, the early Devonian period. (2) The Devonian is not that long after the Cambrian explosion, still a MAJOR embarrassment for evolutionism since Darwin worried about it (see Darwin’s Doubt and Darwin’s Dilemma). (3) Coelacanths thrived for 344 million years largely unchanged, with some allowance for horizontal variation. (4) Coelacanths never did evolve into land animals, despite the just-so stories evolutionists told about them, imagining their bony fins turning into legs. (5) The fish turned up in 1938 alive and well despite evolutionists’ stories that they had gone extinct with the dinosaurs. (6) The fish had not evolved in all that time, either. (7) The 66-million-year gap calls into question the evolutionary timeline itself. (8) And now, this new paper wants to resurrect the extinct evolutionary notion of “vestigial organs.”Why should anyone trust these guys?The fossils are hard data. The living fish are hard data. That much can be studied scientifically. The tall tales about great antiquity of these fish over millions of unobserved years are “fish stories” concocted to fit an evolutionary worldview. It’s long past time to scuttle the evolutionary gaffes and view coelacanths as beautifully designed fish.The proper approach to coelacanth research would be to look at the alleged “vestigial lung” as a feature with an unknown function (note to evolutionists: if it functions during embryogenesis, it is not vestigial, anymore than your bellybutton is). Science should sanitize its vocabulary of debunked evolutionary verbiage like “vestigial organs” and examine things with the wisdom of Paul Nelson’s father, “If something works, it’s not happening by accident” (quote from Flight: The Genius of Birds). (Visited 496 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more


first_imgBrand South Africa hosted a dialogue with Eskom to drive the road safety messaging to young professionals. The two entities partnered in delivering the message to the public.Play Your Part and Lebo Ramodike spent the day promoting car road worthiness in the Free State. (Image: Mathiba Molefe)Brand South Africa reporterEvery year, when the December festive season draws near, Eskom turns an eye towards road safety to ensure its staff and the public play their part in making our roads safer.This year, Brand South Africa joined Eskom Free State in delivering the road safety message on 24 November.Eskom is the state-owned power company responsible for producing most of the country’s electricity.“This morning, Brand SA came to speak to our staff to encourage them to play their part this holiday season, to ensure that they travel safely with their families and friends,” said Stefanie Jansen van Rensburg, Eskom Free State spokesperson.“When we’re on the road it’s very easy to blame other people for their bad habits, but if everyone can play their part, if you can act safely and I can act safely, then our roads would be that much safer.”Many road accidents can be avoided if everyone exercises caution at all times.Checking that your vehicle is roadworthy, making sure you are well-rested, keeping an eye out for reckless drivers as well as making use of all your car’s safety features, such as seatbelts, can go a long way to ensuring the wellbeing of people on the roads.“We all need to remember that the vehicles we are driving are like loaded guns; they have the ability to kill people,” Van Rensburg said. “So we need to handle these vehicles with the utmost care and also make sure that the people in our vehicles are safe by keeping in mind that not everybody will be as careful.”Brand South Africa and Eskom wished all South Africans, residents and visitors a happy festive season. The two state agencies urged everyone to act safely and to play their part in making sure everybody got to their destination and made it home safely ahead of the year to come.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more


first_imgWordPress for Enterprise – How This Open-… Tags:#Trending How to Make the Most of Your Software Developer… Related Posts Keith Krach is chairman and former CEO of DocuSign. A Silicon Valley veteran, Krach has led the creation of several new categories, including DTM at DocuSign, Mechanical Design Synthesis at Rasna and B2B ecommerce during his role as chairman, CEO and co-founder of Ariba. He once was the youngest vice president at General Motors, where he was an early pioneer in robotics and oversaw a joint venture with Japanese-based Fujitsu Fanuc. What Nobody Teaches You About Getting Your Star… Keith Krach Kickstarting a Stagnant Company What Matters Most is Luck. Not!During my battle-tested career, I have always heard, “Krach, you are just so lucky.” I look down at the ground and shrug my shoulders and say, “Yah, I guess I’m just lucky” or, “I was just at right place, right time.”I am certainly blessed. Born into a loving family, growing up in the heartland of this great country in a simpler time and humble manner. I learned to appreciate the value of hard work and I grew up with an earnest desire to make a difference in the world.  I’ve spent a lot of time in my life thinking about the concept of luck and what that word really means. Is it flipping a coin at a fork in the road or being dealt the right card at the right moment? Whether you choose to believe it’s karma or a blessing, there are divine moments that protect and shape us. But most of the time, I believe that we make our own luck.  Luck is self-propelling and a magic that we can generate and magnify. I believe the definition of luck is when preparation meets opportunity. The harder you work, the luckier you get.  I call it the Frank Wilson Theory.When Frank Wilson joined our basketball team in 7th grade, I thought he was the luckiest guy I had ever met. He immediately emerged as the star of our squad, scoring on average a sparkling 18 points a game. I was baffled though. He could barely jump, let alone dribble, and his jump shot was extremely ugly (sorry, Frank). He was a lefty and he would awkwardly short-arm the ball toward the hoop. I just couldn’t understand how this guy could score so many points. I figured he was just lucky.Then one day, the father of one of our teammates brought a 16-millimeter video camera to shoot one of our games. We played well and won the game, thanks to another game-winning shot from Frank. The next day at practice, the coach invited us all to watch the tape of the game. While everyone else followed the action of the game, I kept my eyes focused on Frank the entire time. As the tape played, it hit me like lightning. What Frank could do better than all of us was what he did when he didn’t have the ball. The act of getting in the right position at the right time was what mattered most. He would use his smallish frame to duck around picks and slide into open positions just under the hoop and in the corners where, when someone passed the ball, he could hit his little duck-shot with perfect accuracy.I began to see Frank in a new light. I also began to watch him at practice. While the rest of the team was lobbing up half-court trick shots and goofing around, there was Frank running drills, by himself. What I realized, it wasn’t that Frank wasn’t lucky when it came to playing basketball—he was prepared. When the opportunity presented itself, Frank was right there, ready to make his own “luck.” That was how Frank taught me a profound lesson:What matters most in life is what you do when nobody is looking.Thanks to Frank, I now have a deep conviction of the importance of preparation and constantly sharpening the saw. One of the most tangible examples I can share relates to how I approach public speaking. Whether it’s for a commencement address or a quick TV appearance that will generate a mere sound bite, I will spend hours preparing for a delivery that will take just a few minutes. There have been times when my team has witnessed me spend an entire 90-minute car ride getting ready for a short 3-minute after-dinner speech. I prepare for any question that could come my way. People might applaud me for my great improvisational speaking skills without realizing how much work actually went into making it look casual and spontaneous. So if it looks like I put my foot in my mouth, there is a chance that I meant to put it there.Similarly, anytime I go to a conference or attend an event, I take the time to memorize the LinkedIn profile of the attendees. There is no better way to meaningfully connect than jumping to the heart of finding something in common with people you “just happened” to meet. I’m fairly confident that if Dale Carnegie were still around to write an update to his classic book How To Win Friends And Influence People, he would have certainly included a chapter on memorizing not just names, but LinkedIn profiles as well (you’re welcome, LinkedIn.)As Thomas Edison so aptly put it: “Opportunity is missed by most people because it’s dressed in overalls and looks like work.” So, Frank, if you are reading this, I’m sorry I ever thought you were lucky. Your example taught me one of the greatest lessons in life—what matters most is what you do when nobody is looking—and that is a wisdom that I have shared with many.  So Frank, wherever you are in this world, I thank you. And I wish you all the luck in the world, knowing full well you don’t need it.last_img read more


first_imgThe best way to learn from famous filmmakers is to listen to them – DVD commentaries are your film school on demand.DVD filmmaker commentaries offer you an incredible opportunity to learn from some of the best filmmakers who have ever lived, and even ones who are now dead, about the art and craft of great filmmaking. Personally I’m a big fan of DVD extras (here’s my best suggestions for film editors) and thanks to dedicated curators like Filmschool Thru Commentaries and Film School Reject’s Commentary-Commentary you can digest all the best filmmaking wisdom a filmmaker may have poured forth across all their DVD commentaries in one or two succinct video lessons. Here’s a quick round up of some of the best.Filmschool The Paul Thomas Anderson WayIf Paul Thomas Anderson is telling the truth then checking out these two videos might save you two decades of filmschool education as you listen in to what director John Sturges has to say about great filmmaking: If you’re one for learning about the references that Paul Thomas Anderson (and other directors like Stanley Kubrick) riff off-of then check out this great video from PTA on Max Ophuls – master of the tracking shot.Action Film MasterclassesIf you’re a fan of Jan De Bont, John McTiernan or Kathryn Bigelow’s many fantastic action movies then these are the commentaries for you:33 Things We Learned from the Hurt Locker Commentary – #8Bigelow used the Phantom camera to give “a sense of the roiling mass of air preceding any kind of detonation and hence the rocks lifting off the ground.” She says the camera can shoot ten to twenty thousand frames per second and “kind of unpack those events in a sort of granular way.” She’s such a nerd. Saving The Best Till Last – SchwarzeneggerIf you’ve not seen this compilation of the best of Arnold Schwarzenegger’s DVD commentary for Total Recall then you’re in for a treat. Not so much filmmaking wisdom, more filmmaking say-what-you-see. Funny stuff!last_img read more


first_imgLos Angeles: Leonardo DiCaprio has revealed he was star-struck by his “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” co-star Luke Perry. The actor said he grew up watching “Beverly Hills, 90210” and working with the late actor on Quentin Tarantino’s directorial was a delight. “(Luke was) the kindest, sweetest human being you could ever encounter. I grew up with him on ‘90210,’ looking up to him as literally the coolest dude on earth and honestly when I was on set I was star struck. “We got to sit down and chat, he couldn’t have been a more amazing human being. It’s a real tragic loss,” DiCaprio told Extra magazine. “Once Upon…” marks the last cinematic outing for Perry, who essayed the role of Scott Lancer, an actor in one of the shows Rick stars in. Perry died in March at the age of 52.last_img read more


Tuesday’s match to watch is Italy vs. Uruguay, essentially a must-win duel (for Uruguay at least) between the 16th- and 10th-best sides in the world according to ESPN’s Soccer Power Index (SPI). A surprisingly close second? Costa Rica-England, which features a group leader and an eliminated team with nothing but pride to play for. In between, there’s plenty of action in Group C, where every team is technically alive and fighting to advance to the Round of 16.Costa Rica vs. England: 12 p.m. EDTItaly vs. Uruguay: 12 p.m. EDTGreece vs. Ivory Coast: 4 p.m. EDTJapan vs. Colombia: 4 p.m. EDTIN BRIEFSee our World Cup predictions for the latest probabilities.IN DEPTHIt’s tough to overstate what’s on the line in Tuesday’s match between Uruguay and Italy. Both teams are tied for second place in Group D with three points apiece, although Italy holds the all-important tiebreaker with a superior goal differential.Group D’s leader, Costa Rica, won its first two matches and has guaranteed itself a spot in the next round, so there’s only one unclaimed berth left in the group. Uruguay is the favorite to win the match by SPI, about 41 percent to 30 percent (with a 29 percent probability of a draw), and that’s not because of defense. Neither team has been particularly dominant at that end of the pitch, but Uruguay has allowed four goals in the tournament, including three to a Costa Rican side that’s far from a scoring juggernaut.Instead, the odds are in Uruguay’s favor mostly because — theoretically speaking — it has the better offense, led by the sublime forward Luis Suarez. After not appearing at all in Uruguay’s opening loss against Costa Rica, Suarez returned from a knee injury Thursday to score a pair of goals and help sink England’s World Cup hopes. He’ll continue to get support from the passing of Edinson Cavani, Cristian Rodríguez and Nicolás Lodeiro. But Suarez aside, La Celeste has had some difficulty generating consistent scoring chances in the tournament so far, and Uruguay will have a hard time winning if it continues to muster only 8.5 shots per game.Meanwhile, Italy was expected to be in the middle of the pack offensively before the tournament, and it’s played largely to form. Mario Balotelli has been his customarily uneven self; he picked up a goal and caused all manner of havoc against England, then promptly had a terrible game (three offsides, one yellow card and only one shot on target) against Costa Rica. Andrea Pirlo’s passing remains superb, and the Italian offense plays with an efficient style — forgoing crosses in favor of passes through the middle of the pitch — but it’s also had a lot of trouble sustaining attacks in the opponent’s third.Uruguay might not be the best opponent for the pass-heavy Italian style; it’s been one of the best defenses at intercepting passes so far in the World Cup. Watch for the stark contrast between Italy’s ball control-centric offensive game and the more direct Uruguayan style, which sacrifices possession in favor of the long ball, and attempts to win by attacking from the wings and winning balls in the air. Each approach represents one side of a fierce philosophical divide in soccer, and which one prevails will go a long way toward determining who advances out of Group D.It’s worth noting that our World Cup odds list Italy as the favorites to advance despite Uruguay being favored in this specific match. That’s because in the event of a draw, Italy would claim second place in the group on goal differential. An Uruguayan win is the single most likely outcome of the game, but there’s also a 59 percent chance that Uruguay doesn’t win the match and fails to advance. Confused yet?The second-best game of the day (at least according to our method of taking the harmonic mean of the two competitors’ SPI scores) is Costa Rica vs. England. It’s a fine matchup, but the stakes are as low as it gets for both teams. Costa Rica has clinched a berth in the knockout round (and has an 89 percent chance of winning Group D), and England has been mathematically eliminated.The remaining games have some implications for the next round, though Colombia has already punched its ticket into the Round of 16 and Japan’s odds are slim. Greece vs. Ivory Coast offers a bit more to play for: Greece has a better than 19 percent chance of making it to the knockout stage, but SPI also predicts the match to be a dreary, low-scoring affair.YESTERDAYThe Netherlands avoided a matchup with Brazil in the Round of 16 by defeating Chile 2-0 in their Group B finale Monday. The Netherlands’ chance of advancing to the quarterfinals is now 69 percent, while Chile must face Brazil on Sunday with odds of 26 percent. The Dutch would have been an underdog against Brazil, advancing 23 percent of the time.For the first 75 minutes Monday, the Netherlands struggled to get opportunities, completing two of 16 passes into the attacking penalty area and creating four total chances. Then in the final 15 minutes plus stoppage time, the Dutch completed two of four passes into the attacking penalty area, creating two chances and scoring on both. Substitute Leroy Fer gave the Netherlands the lead less than two minutes after entering the match with just his second touch of the game.The Netherlands struggled not only on passes into the box; Dutch players completed 63.9 percent of passes overall, their worst rate in a World Cup match in at least 50 years. In their first two wins, the Dutch completed 78.9 percent of their passes.Chile had the majority of possession, with 657 touches to the Netherlands’ 395, but couldn’t get anything going in the Netherlands’ penalty area. Chile managed seven shots, one of which was on target, and had less than 2 percent of its overall touches (13) in the attacking penalty area.Part of the trouble could have been that Chile was fouled 26 times, the most in a match in this year’s World Cup. Forward Alexis Sanchez was fouled nine times, two more than anyone else this tournament.Later, Mexico and Croatia were scoreless through 70 minutes, and Mexico was poised to become the first team under the current tournament format to advance to the knockout round scoring exactly one goal. But then El Tri scored three times in 11 minutes to propel Mexico to the knockout round and a matchup with the Netherlands.Two of Mexico’s three goals came from headers — a rarity, as El Tri scored two headed goals in its past two World Cup appearances combined. Mexico’s third goal came from Javier Hernandez, who’s come off the bench in each of Mexico’s three matches and ended his career-long scoreless streak for his country Monday. His goal was one of 21 scored by substitutes this tournament, the most ever in a group stage (substitutes were first allowed in 1970). —  Jacob Nitzberg, senior stats analyst, ESPNOFF THE PITCHBelieve it or not, Italian food just wouldn’t be the same without its relationship with Uruguay. Although the country is known for its carb-heavy offerings, the roles of meat and fish in the Italian diet can’t be discounted. According to 2012 data from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, 45 percent of Uruguay’s exports to Italy were bovine meat, followed by frozen fish fillets, at 16 percent. Follow the trade route in the opposite direction, and Italian exports to Uruguay run the gamut. They’re mostly concentrated in machinery — sewing machinery, tractors, furnaces, etc. But perfumery, cosmetics,and eyewear play a noticeable role as well. And, of course, it wouldn’t be Italian trade if it didn’t include pasta, of which Italy sent a healthy $2.4 million worth to Uruguay. — Hayley MunguiaFURTHER READINGAdvancement Scenarios For Groups C And DWatching the USMNT on Copacabana Beach in RioWorld Cup Pass & Move: I Can’t Believe That We Did Draw! read more